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Apple Maps adds Flyover 3D modeling of Berkeley, East Bay - Apple Insider

UC Berkeley news - April 18, 2014 - 14:00

Apple Insider

Apple Maps adds Flyover 3D modeling of Berkeley, East Bay
Apple Insider
Apple has expanded its 3D Maps Flyover support for the east side of the San Francisco Bay Area, including the city of Berkeley, the University of California birthplace of the flavor of Unix used in OS X and iOS. UC Berkeley Floyover. Apple has ...

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UC Berkeley acceptance rate plunges amid new admission process - Sacramento Bee (blog)

UC Berkeley news - April 18, 2014 - 09:50

NBC Bay Area

UC Berkeley acceptance rate plunges amid new admission process
Sacramento Bee (blog)
Preliminary University of California admission data released Friday showed Berkeley's acceptance rate falling to 17.3 percent, from 20.8 percent in 2013, with more than 1,300 fewer students admitted to the campus this year despite a huge increase to a ...
Campus releases freshman admission dataUC Berkeley
More Latino Than White Students Admitted To University Of California SchoolsCBS Local
Capitol Alert: UC Berkeley acceptance rate plunges amid new admission processThe San Luis Obispo Tribune
Daily Californian -Los Angeles Times -Fresno Bee
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Who is Responsible for the University? Lessons from an Almost Strike

Remaking the University - April 17, 2014 - 13:33
By Jennifer Ruth (Department of English, Portland State University)
At Portland State University, we voted to authorize a strike this spring if our collective bargaining team could not reach an agreement with the administration. Nine days before the strike would have begun, on April 6th, a tentative agreement was achieved. PSU-AAUP members voted April 15th and 16th on whether or not to ratify the agreement. The expectation is that the agreement will be ratified.
PSU has had a collective bargaining chapter since 1978 but never voted to authorize a strike before.
Why now?
The rot here is no different from that seen across the nation at countless state universities: spiking student tuition for a student body least capable of shouldering  debt; drastic decline in state funding over thirty years; gradual and now unsustainable increases in non-tenure-track and adjunct faculty over the same thirty years; more top administrators than ever before, more of whom are “outsiders” bereft of institutional history and relationships.
Surely the story here is a familiar one elsewhere as well? Surely, elsewhere, too, the once vital shared governance between an almost wholly tenure-track faculty and a set of administrators who rose from their ranks has deteriorated into what faculty term a “shit show” of open hostility and contempt from both sides. On one side is an increasingly disaffected and resentful mix of tenure-line and non-tenure-line faculty; and on the other, an administration distracted by its search for quick fixes (MOOCs!)

It doesn’t surprise me that our union decided to stake everything to force some of these issues onto the bargaining table. What surprises me is that the administration looked so baffled and so bewildered when they played and we didn’t dance. What did they think happens when a university’s budget is leveraged on a disposable workforce? Did they expect new levels of trust in, and loyalty towards, the institution?

Why here? That’s a tough question to answer since I imagine that many universities are on the cusp of the same set of events we’ve just experienced. Does it ultimately come down to the confluence of individuals involved? A union President and bargaining team with the courage to force a crisis, a set of administrators singularly unaware of, and so unprepared for, the depth of the dysfunction under their noses? An analysis that lights on individuals in their uniqueness and freedom is not one that a structuralist like me offers with great confidence but what else?
What now is the more important question. I had moments of deep frustration with the union leadership over these last months. In particular, I felt that the narrative they relied upon was one that scapegoated the two people at the very top – the President and Provost – for a rotten infrastructure that was many years in the rotting. We – the faculty, those in union leadership, many members of senate, department chairs and senior faculty—had been here much longer than had either the president or provost and my experience as chair of my department had taught me very clearly that we – tenured faculty and chairs—had done as much to create the mess as anybody else. Were we going to be able to fix things if we weren’t honest about how they’d gotten so messed up in the first place? Driving two people out of their jobs would not break down the system and rebuild it along more sustainable and ethical lines.
The reality that we were all going to have to account for ourselves—not just the President and Provost—sunk in when I attended a forum held by the union leadership in the final days of bargaining. The most dramatic testimony that night was given by someone who had been an adjunct at PSU for thirteen years. He talked about the letters of recommendation he’d written over the years. Letters of recommendation—like so much else at the university—presume a stable faculty paid the kind of salary and given the kind of professional status that allows him or her to do many numbers of things without negotiating for a “wage” in return.
So PSU hired this person term after term, paid him peanuts, and relied upon him to write letters of recommendations for a generation of students. Our president had been here six years and the provost one and a half. They didn’t even know this adjunct existed. Who did? The chair of the department he taught in. And if the tenure-track faculty in that department did not know he existed, they should have. When they asked for a course release to finish their book projects, did they ask about the adjunct who would be hired to fill their place? The fact that this person was invisible was not one person’s fault but nor do I want to invoke the phrase “broken system” here. Real people signed these contracts; real departments relied upon this labor. It is the fault of  both administrators and tenured faculty.
Calling out our own quiet complicity in the deterioration of the university and the exploitation of adjuncts is not for the faint of heart. Rebecca Schuman, whom few people would consider faint of heart, was herself deeply shocked by the vitriol that spewed forth when she suggested in a blog post that we stop hiring adjuncts. Well-meaning tenure-track faculty ask her all the time, she wrote, “but what can we do?” Here’s a thought, she said: Don’t hire someone on wages you wouldn’t accept. People were not prepared for that answer. We have become far more comfortable blaming administrators as if they alone run universities. Those of us with tenure are also responsible for what happens at our universities.
Unions like PSU-AAUP have taken the first step: they woke up our administration. “I have heard you, and I'm listening,” President Wiewel told Faculty Senate in remarks that were then forwarded to the rest of the campus community. “We should explore strengthening tenure by looking at developing a system that works for what are now fixed-term faculty,” he said. He did not mention adjuncts. But we must. It’s up to the tenured faculty to see him on “strengthening tenure” and raise him one by bringing adjuncts into the picture. If we fail to do this over the next two years, I hope the same confluence of unique and free individuals rise to the occasion again when a new contract is bargained. 

Deltopia in Review, Part 1: Party Riot or Police Occupation?

Remaking the University - April 17, 2014 - 13:32
Ten days after the Deltopia: Party Riot trailers and pirated clips hit the Internet, my effort to watch 100% of the clips and read 100% of the accounts has led me to this conclusion: this was not the student-run production that I was told to expect. My expectations were fueled by media coverage that depicted students and other student-age partiers turning sour and attacking the police. "Deltopia Leads to 100 Arrests, 44 Hospitalizations," screamed the early Huffpo headline about the Saturday April 5th event. The local ABC affiliate announced, "Mob Turns on Cops. A second clip from this station, KEYT, featured both a stabbing of one visitor by another (suspect apprehended) and the arrest of a UCSB student for dancing on his friend's car. The weekly alternative student newspaper,The Bottom Line, furnished full-tilt riot coverage. When I saw that this student eyewitness account lined up with that of our local retiree-oriented TV station, I thought there must have been a serious student / partier offensive against beleagured law enforcement.

I went looking for images of and eyewitness testimony about this specific claim -- "mob turns on cops."  I devoted part of a  lecture on The Grapes of Wrath to a discussion of Deltopia with the 180 students in my "Noir California" course, discussed the event with a 17-student honors section,  contacted various Isla Vista residents about their experiences, talked at some length to about fifteen individual students, walked I.V. to speak with people there, and repeatedly asked various groups for eyewitness accounts and video evidence.

I wanted precise detail in order to distinguish between two distinct narratives of the event, summarized by these sample headlines:

1. Police Shut-Down of UCSB Deltopia Party Sparks Some Resistance: Officer Was Injured During Arrest

2. UCSB Deltopia Party Becomes Riot: Student Attacks on Police Continue for Hours

Obviously the riot story attracts eyeballs, while an isolated case of resisting arrest and later dumpster-dragging does not.  The riot story is also far more damaging to the reputation of UCSB and its students.  If the media is going to drag UCSB through the "drunken party school" mud again, there had better be some decent evidence that the student body was not only drunk that night, but picking fights with police.

I was not pleased when I tuned into KPCC's Airtalk on April 8th and heard its host, Larry Mantle, describe UCSB as "better known for its hard drinkers than for its academics or community service." The station nailed down this stereotype by conducting a poll on the question, "UCSB Spring Break Riot: Will Deltopia violence spur a change in party school mentality?" My immediate thought was, "screw you Larry (though I know you care about public universities): UCSB is great, and so are our students."  My second thought was, OK, he has the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's public information officer Kelly Hoover on the show; let me listen to her evidence.

Deputy Hoover said that they were prepared for a large crowd, and then described the incident (starting at 1:45).
What happened was, around 9:30 at night, there was a UCSB police officer that was breaking up a fight. He was hit in the head with a backpack that contained large bottles of alcohol. This was a significant injury that required twenty stitches to his head.  We had an officer down. We had law enforcement that were running to assist him. And with all of that commotion it drew a large crowd. And then it just turned.   It just turned into an us-versus-them kind of a mob mentality of people starting to throw rocks, and bricks, and bottles, and full beer cans at law enforcement. It spread over a couple-of-blocks radius, and you know it just kept snowballing on from there, and just getting worse and worse. It took us several hours to be able to get true order over the situation. we called in mutual aid. We had more than a hundred resources come in from both Santa Barbara Count and Ventura County to help us. (my transcription here and below) Deputy Hoover put the Airtalk audience squarely into the Story 2 riot zone.  The first section of her statement, about the injury to the officer and call for assistance, is similar to the official account that Sheriff Bill Brown delivered to the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors the Monday following the incident.   Sheriff Brown didn't continue with claims about widespread student attacks. The backpack slinger was identified as a 17-year-old boy from Los Angeles. He was later arrested and charged as an adult.

Mr. Mantle then invited Deputy Hoover to dogwhistle the popular theme of taxpayer resentment about subsidizing spoiled brats during their college years (the high cost of policing party riots and of funding the University of California itself, with one listener demanding that all state funding be cut so the university would depend on tuition 100%). When an Isla Vista caller suggested to Mr. Mantle that the prior police clampdown had made things worse, Deputy Hoover called the listeners comments "hurtful" (8:08).
It would be ridiculous to have law enforcement back off any more than they are.   Any time we step in it's to . . . . [pause] Of all the hospital transports that we had, the majority of them were for alcohol poisoning. People that were so drunk that they had overdosed on alcohol. People were jumping on top of cars. People were vandalizing.  Is he [the caller] OK with that? Is he OK with women being sexually assaulted?Larry Mantle interrupted Deputy Hoover to clarify: "it sounds like Ed is saying for the police to say out and let that students handle it. That's what I understood him saying."  ("Ed" was actually saying that police conduct was a more destructive form of governance than student self-policing--more on this theme in the next installment.)  Deputy Hoover continued:
There's just no way. There's just too much criminal activity. It's too dangerous. You have people that have been drinking alcohol from morning till night, that are not able to make good decisions, that can get hurt. Like last year, we had a woman fall of the cliffs and die. We had a balcony collapse; that injured several people. We've had recently women sexually assaulted by multiple suspects. We have had a stabbing earlier in the night. We had a robbery, an armed robbery.  If anything we need to have more crackdown on law enforcement [sic], not less.Deputy Hoover was folding all these separate incidents into Deltopia, which became their master source.   When Mr. Mantle asked how the injuried deputies were doing, she replied,
I do want to clarify, we had four that were transported to the hospital; they all had significant injuries.  I am not talking about just getting hit in the head. I'm talking about twenty stitches for one, eight stitches for the other, a hand injury for one that's going to require surgery. These are significant injuries. And also, probably every sheriff's deputy I talked to that was out there was hit with something. They may have not been transported to the hospital, but they have bruises, one was hit in the eye with a bottle, with shrapnel from a bottle. And it's just not OK. It's just absolutely ridiculous. It's uncalled for. Out-of-towners yes, they're coming in and they are causing problems. But we really don't agree with students encouraging Deltopia and opening their doors to people from out of the area who may cause trouble. We do have people arrested who are UCSB students and who are City College students as well. . .  By the time she had finished, the Sheriff Department's information officer had firmly established Story 2, Party Riot, complete with widespread criminality, arrested students, and a mob turning on cops on a scale large enough to have injured virtually all of 160 (or 200?) officers who were there from multiple agencies that evening.

The Airtalk webpage had a number of comments, many of which disputed the riot story or at least the drunken UCSB student stereotype.  The arrest statistics show that 0.65% of the crowd was arrested (130 of 20,000), and that of these 16 were from UCSB and 10 from SBCC. 17 of the 130 arrests involved the nighttime disturbance, with an unknown subset--perhaps just the original one--arrested for a violent felony. Although these numbers don't suggest a massive blowout, the riot stereotype had now been confirmed by an official law enforcement source, and was strengthened by the UCSB administration's hangdog statement on the same webpage.

Deputy Hoover's description of Deltopia is inflammatory--unless it is literally correct (160 injured deputies, a "mob" acting in concert to attack police).  The Sheriff Department has doubled down on it, having launched an ongoing effort to identify people "involved in criminal behavior activity during Deltopia."   The investigation includes interviews with I.V. residents and calls to landlords of property that may have been involved in the launching of objects at officers.  The Sheriff's Department is reviewing audio and video from the surveillance cameras that the UCSB administration paid to have installed at key intersections in Isla Vista (they were removed April 14th).

The Bottom Line's Giuseppe Ricapito reported that the Santa Barbara Sheriff's Department has extended the dragnet to LEEDIR, the Large Emergency Event Digital Information Repository. LEEDIR is an "eyewitness platform," designed to accept and process digital information about emergency events from civilian witnesses.  It is operated by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department with technical support provided by Citizen Global and Amazon Web Services.  Its information page says it was set up in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings, where attendee photos proved helpful in identifying the two main suspects.  LEEDIR's splash page now has an "immediate request for eyewitness photos and videos" for only one event -- "civil unrest at Deltopia in Isla Vista, CA."

This means that Story 2 has not only established Deltopia as a violent riot, UCSB students as drunk, and I.V. residents as incapable of running their own affairs, but has now fed the sheriff's investigation into an electronic repository in which images of partygoers may remain in law enforcement databases indefinitely. LEEDIR defines Deltopia as an "large emergency event," and will store images of people who jumped on cars or threw trash or simply milled around in Isla Vista on the night of April 5th alongside those of the Boston Marathon bombers. 

So Story 2 had better be true.  But in my next post, I'll argue that there is no evidence for it, and then move on to discuss the term "police occupation" in my title.

University of Michigan president-elect Mark Schlissel appointed to medical ... - The Ann Arbor News

UC Berkeley news - April 17, 2014 - 13:22

University of Michigan president-elect Mark Schlissel appointed to medical ...
The Ann Arbor News
In 1999, he joined the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley as an associate professor and was promoted to professor in 2002 and held the position of dean of biological sciences in the College of Letters & Science from 2008 to 2011. In 2011 ...

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Berkeley's Wikipedian helps unlock scholarly silos - Times Higher Education

UC Berkeley news - April 16, 2014 - 16:09

Times Higher Education

Berkeley's Wikipedian helps unlock scholarly silos
Times Higher Education
Earlier this year, the University of California, Berkeley became the first higher education institution to hire a “Wikipedian in residence”. Kevin Gorman, a 24-year-old Berkeley graduate, will help students to publish academic work on the user ...

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Nancy Pelosi to deliver commencement address at UC Berkeley - UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley news - April 16, 2014 - 13:44

UC Berkeley

Nancy Pelosi to deliver commencement address at UC Berkeley
UC Berkeley
BERKELEY —. U.S. House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi will deliver the 2014 commencement address at the University of California, Berkeley. Nancy Pelosi. Pelosi, who has represented San Francisco, California's 12th District for over 26 years and led ...

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Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award - Phys.Org

UC Berkeley news - April 16, 2014 - 12:02

Berkeley Lab's Adam Arkin wins 2013 Lawrence Award
Phys.Org
Arkin is also the Dean A. Richard Newton Memorial Professor for the University of California Berkeley's Department of Bioengineering, PI/CEO/CSO of the Department of Energy's Systems Biology Knowledgebase, Technical Co-Manager of the ENIGMA SFA, ...

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Students, Lawmakers Take Stand Against Sexual Violence - NBC Bay Area

UC Berkeley news - April 15, 2014 - 18:50

NBC Bay Area

Students, Lawmakers Take Stand Against Sexual Violence
NBC Bay Area
Thirty-one sexual assault victims have filed a federal lawsuit against the University of California, Berkeley. Cheryl Hurd reports. Students, Lawmakers Take Stand... Link; Embed; Email. Copy. Close. Link to this video. http://www.nbcbayarea.com/video/#!
Cal sexual-assault victims share storiesKTVU San Francisco
Congresswomen meet with Dirks, student sexual assault survivors on campusDaily Californian
Congresswoman urges better protections against campus sexual assaultLos Angeles Times

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Cuonzo Martin Named Cal Men's Basketball Coach - Cal Athletics

UC Berkeley news - April 15, 2014 - 14:48

The Chattanoogan

Cuonzo Martin Named Cal Men's Basketball Coach
Cal Athletics
Bringing a track record of success that includes a conference Coach of the Year honor and postseason berths each of the past five seasons, Cuonzo Martin has been named the 16th head men's basketball coach at the University of California, Berkeley, ...
Cuonzo Martin Leaves Tennessee For Job At CaliforniaThe Chattanoogan
Kingsley Okoroh flips from Tennessee to Cal, Idrissa Diallo reconsidering?California Golden Blogs (blog)
Tennessee coach Cuonzo Martin to take job at UC BerkeleyFOXSports.com

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Kingsley Okoroh is an ELITE Shot Blocker – University of California Berkeley ... - Hoopsfix (blog)

UC Berkeley news - April 15, 2014 - 13:20

Hoopsfix (blog)

Kingsley Okoroh is an ELITE Shot Blocker – University of California Berkeley ...
Hoopsfix (blog)
The 7'1″ centre from Derby has elite shot blocking skills and originally verbally committed to the University of Tennessee Vols, but then de-committed and verballed to the University of California Berkeley Bears after his coach moved. He spent this ...

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Furniture store reopens after Berkeley fire - abc7news.com

UC Berkeley news - April 15, 2014 - 12:56

Furniture store reopens after Berkeley fire
abc7news.com
One irreplaceable item lost in the fire was lumber acquired from University of California at Berkeley's Memorial Stadium. The Wooden Duck constructs furniture from seats torn out of the stadium during its recent renovation. Much of that lumber is ...

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Guggenheim fellowships go to eight Berkeley faculty - UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley news - April 15, 2014 - 11:10

UC Berkeley

Guggenheim fellowships go to eight Berkeley faculty
UC Berkeley
This year's fellows, chosen from nearly 3,000 applicants in the United States and Canada, include 15 researchers and artists from throughout the University of California system. The eight fellows from Berkeley are: Nezar AlSayyad, professor of ...

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Congress Recycles Higher Ed Myths

Changing Universities - April 15, 2014 - 09:53
Currently, the US Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions is holding a series of hearings in anticipation of the reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.  The main underlying theme appears to be that the Democrats want to regulate the for-profit colleges and do something about student debt, while the Republicans would like to deregulate higher education and help the “free market” expand its reaches into public higher education.  In a recent hearing on student debt, this polarized discourse was mediated by a bipartisan set of misconceptions regarding the costs of higher education. 
During his opening statement, ranking Republican member, Lamar Alexander set the stage by arguing that since the average cost for community college was about $3,000 and students receive over $4,000 in aid, some of the money must be going to other things.  In fact, Alexander’s own press release entitled, "College More Affordable than Most Students Think,” argues that, “The average community college student in America is receiving about $1,500 more in grants and scholarships than it costs in tuition and fees” The problem with Alexander’s argument is that he fails to take into account the total cost of education (tuition, fees, room, board, books, and living expenses), and so he can pretend that there is no reason for students to borrow, and if they are borrowing, it is for personal pleasure.

According to Alexander, “An Inspector General’s report from the U.S. Department of Education warns that some students borrow excessively for personal expenses not related to their education.”  However, it is clear that students need a place to live and they have to buy books for their classes, and so these non-educational expenses are actually the main cause for student debt.  The US Department of Education reports that the total annual cost of attendance for a full-time community college student is  $13,237, so if students are receiving on average $4,500 in grant funding, they are still on the hook for close to $9,000 per year. 

Apparently, not only Alexander fails to understand the difference between the cost of tuition and the total cost of attendance, but also James W. Runcie , Chief Operating Officer of Federal Student Aid of the Department of Education, does not understand why students borrow money to go to college.  In response to Alexander’s question about why students are taking out more money than they need, Runcie, (at minute 50) simply says that this is a concern, and the department is looking into possible cases of fraud or abuse.  The underlying message Alexander and others are circulating is college students are going into debt because they are borrowing money to spend on leisure items like fancy cars and clothing. 

This failure to understand the true cost of attending college is also shaping several recent proposals to make community college freeto students in Tennessee, Mississippi, and Oregon.  All of these states are only discussing making tuition free, but most lower- and lower-middle-income students already have their tuition covered by state and federal grants.  This means that only upper-income students will receive the new break, and these tuition-free programs may end up cutting additional funding to the non-wealthy students who need aid to pay for the non-tuition aspects of the total cost of attendance.   Once again, a progressive sounding policy turns out to be welfare for the wealthy as the non-wealthy continue to get stuck with the bill. 

University of California – Berkeley wins USTA National Championship - TheSportsCampus.com

UC Berkeley news - April 14, 2014 - 20:47

University of CaliforniaBerkeley wins USTA National Championship
TheSportsCampus.com
The United States Tennis Association (USTA) announced that University of CaliforniaBerkeley captured the National Championship title at the 2014 USTA Tennis on Campus National Campus Championship, held at Surprise Tennis & Racquet Center in ...
Tennis Briefs(4): UF 2nd at TOC Nationals; Stewart Wins Easter BowlUSTA Florida

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Berkeley Furniture Shop Reopens After Fire Destroys Warehouse - Patch.com

UC Berkeley news - April 14, 2014 - 20:23

Berkeley Furniture Shop Reopens After Fire Destroys Warehouse
Patch.com
One irreplaceable item lost in the fire was lumber acquired from University of California at Berkeley's Memorial Stadium. The Wooden Duck constructs furniture from seats torn out of the stadium during its recent renovation. Much of that lumber is ...

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Berkeley furniture store reopens after massive fire destroys warehouse - KTVU San Francisco

UC Berkeley news - April 14, 2014 - 14:25

Berkeley furniture store reopens after massive fire destroys warehouse
KTVU San Francisco
One irreplaceable item lost in the fire was lumber acquired from University of California at Berkeley's Memorial Stadium. The Wooden Duck constructs furniture from seats torn out of the stadium during its recent renovation. Much of that lumber is ...

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Berkeley furniture store reopens after massive fire - KCRA Sacramento

UC Berkeley news - April 14, 2014 - 12:36

KCRA Sacramento

Berkeley furniture store reopens after massive fire
KCRA Sacramento
One irreplaceable item lost in the fire was lumber acquired from University of California at Berkeley's Memorial Stadium. The Wooden Duck constructs furniture from seats torn out of the stadium during its recent renovation. Much of that lumber is ...

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Wooden Duck, Berkeley Furniture Store, Reopens Following Weekend Fire - NBC Bay Area

UC Berkeley news - April 14, 2014 - 12:31

NBC Bay Area

Wooden Duck, Berkeley Furniture Store, Reopens Following Weekend Fire
NBC Bay Area
One irreplaceable item lost in the fire was lumber acquired from University of California at Berkeley's Memorial Stadium. The Wooden Duck constructs furniture from seats torn out of the stadium during its recent renovation. Much of that lumber is ...

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UC Berkeley captures tennis National Championship title - newszap.com

UC Berkeley news - April 14, 2014 - 10:49

UC Berkeley captures tennis National Championship title
newszap.com
The United States Tennis Association announced that University of CaliforniaBerkeley captured the National Championship title at the 2014 USTA Tennis on Campus National Campus Championship, held at Surprise Tennis & Racquet Center in Surprise ...
Tennis Briefs(4): UF 2nd at TOC Nationals; Stewart Wins Easter BowlUSTA Florida

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